Lost & Found at the Movies Explores L.A.’s Greatest Roles

Los Angeles has been a “character” in countless films. On Thursday, July 24, the latest edition of Lost & Found at the Movies, the Library Foundation’s new series celebrating the art of cinema and the vitality of film culture, will explore the myriad ways L.A. has appeared in cinema —from the earliest images of the silent era, through the landscape of noir to visions of the future (with our rendition of a fireworks finale).

Series curator John Nein, along with special guests, film critic Kenneth Turan, and historian Marc Wanamaker, will tour iconic landmarks, long gone places, film classics and archival treasures that shine a light on the great diversity of L.A. As a background prop for the early silent films to the defining setting of “noir” classics, this program will explore what cinema reveals about this city and its communities. The program will also look at Los Angeles as it was documented in early non-fiction reels: rare films from UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Academy Film Archive.

A film historian, archivist and a native of Los Angeles, Marc Wanamaker will bring his expertise on the history of Los Angeles and the motion picture and television industries. Few people know the city as a location as well, which has served many of film seeking to recreate the locations of old. And Los Angeles Times’ and NPR’s Kenneth Turan will discuss some of his favorite L.A. films, including Bombshell (1933), Chinatown (1974), The Exiles (1961) and others – some of which appear in his new book Not to be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites From a Lifetime of Film. Take a sneak peek below from these movies to help set the stage for this upcoming retrospect on some of L.A.’s greatest roles.

Learn more about Lost & Found at the Movies: LA on Film.

Globetrotting with the LAPL’s Travel Poster Collection

Summer is the season of travel. Whether you are planning an exotic international trip or a laidback SoCal staycation, the Los Angeles Public Library’s Travel Poster Collection will inspire anyone wanting to get away. We’ve selected a few of the beautiful historical posters housed in the International Languages Department and Rare Books at Central Library. The artwork finely demonstrates the sensibilities of 1920s and 1930s Art Deco and early Futurism, and showcases some of the wonderful treasures of one of Los Angeles’s greatest cultural destinations–the Library.

Bermuda


 

L’ete Sur La Cote D’azure


 

Japanese Government Railways


 

Mexican Tourist Association


 

Sevilla, Fiestas de Primavera 1930, Semana Santa Feria En El Recinto De La Exposicion Ibero – Americana


Romances in Egypt, Created by M. Azmy

Learn more about the LAPL’s Visual Collections here.

Illuminating the Parallels Between Us and Animals

We love animals—they can be furry, fun, expressive…and moody, just like us!

If you’ve ever wondered what your pet was thinking, you’ve probably compared your pet’s feelings to human emotions. The authors of the upcoming ALOUD program “Not Uniquely Human: The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health” show us just how  much we can in fact learn from such comparisons.


On July 10th, ALOUD convenes author Laurel Braitman (Animal Madness), Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers (Zoobiquity) for a conversation on the vast commonalities between human and animal mental and physical health. From an anxiety ridden dog who jumped out of a window to performance anxiety among thoroughbred horses, the authors will share poignant and entertaining examples from their personal experiences and outside research that illuminates the parallels between us and the animal world.

Laurel Braitman, author and science historian, delves into the uncanny similarities between the species in her new book Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves. Braitman’s anthropological background prompted her to closely observe the compulsive behavior of her new Bernese Mountain Dog, and to then realize that something was indeed very wrong. This discovery took Braitman down a path of realization that nonhuman animals can suffer from the same mental illnesses that humans do:

“Every animal with a mind has the capacity to lose hold of it from time to time. Sometimes the trigger is abuse or mistreatment, but not always. I’ve come across depressed and anxious gorillas, compulsive horses, rats, donkeys, and seals, obsessive parrots, self-harming dolphins, and dogs with dementia, many of whom share their exhibits, homes, or habitats with other creatures who don’t suffer from the same problems. …There is plenty of abnormal behavior in the animal world, captive, domestic, and wild, and plenty of evidence of recovery; you simply need to know where and how to find it.”

Using evidence from veterinary sciences, medical and mental health professionals, Darwin’s historical accounts, zoo keepers, animal handlers, pet owners and more, Animal Madness proves that animals of all species may suffer from similar mental disorders, and that if we use our understanding of mental and emotional issues in humans, we might be able to better help animals suffering from similar conditions.

Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers, authors of Zoobiquity, also champion the similarities between humans and animals by focusing on some surprising physical health problems that can arise across species. Cardiologist Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz began looking within the animal kingdom for examples of health issues she saw in her human patients, and was shocked to find many parallels that could be used as beneficial comparisons in diagnosing humans: bears struggling with obesity, monkeys developing heart failure, and chimpanzees fainting when stressed or dehydrated. Each case the authors encountered reinforced their belief that human and animal doctors should be working together in order to find, share and improve upon solutions to pan-species health problems.

These books argue that instead of treating humans and animals separately, we can better help ourselves and our animal friends by fostering a greater understanding of the animal kingdom and incorporating this knowledge into our daily lives and health care system.

Join in the discussion on July 10th to hear the unique and quirky stories of the characters that make up these two fascinating reads.

“Every creature in the world is like a book and a picture, to us, and a mirror.” –Alain de Lille, c. 1200 (from Animal Madness)

All photos above from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection.

The Faces of The Library Store On Wheels

Come visit these smiling faces at any of The Library Store On Wheels’ upcoming stops!

Saturday 7/19 @ Donald Bruce Kaufman Library Anniversary 2 – 5PM

Saturday 7/19 @ Renegade Craft Fair 11AM – 6PM

Sunday 7/19 @ Renegade Craft Fair 11AM – 6PM

Friday 8/15 @ 626 Night Market 4PM – 1AM

Saturday 8/16 @ 626 Night Market 4pm – 1am

Stay tuned for more updates! Follow @TheLibraryStore on Twitter and Instagram for new additions to the schedule.

 

Fun and Free for the Fourth of July

Looking for fun things to celebrate the fourth with kids or teens? From stories to crafts to music, Megan Katz, a Children’s Librarian at the John C. Fremont Branch has handpicked events your family will love. Not only are these selections fun, but they’ll also teach your little ones about the history of this important holiday without the stuffiness of a text book. Check out all of Megan’s free suggestions below at the Los Angeles Public Library.

http://jpg1.lapl.org/00109/00109714.jpg 

EVENTS:

Tuesday, July 1, 4:00 pm
Fourth of July Craft and Storytime
(for Children)
Harbor Gateway Branch

Thursday, July 3, 4:00 pm
Fourth of July Ice Cream Party
(for Families)
John C. Fremont Branch

Tuesday, July 8, 4:00 pm
Bluegrass Folk Americana with “Sometimes in Tune”
(for Families)
Encino-Tarzana Branch

Tuesday, July 15, 4:00 pm
Independence Day Craft
(for Teens)
Alma Reaves Woods Watts Branch

BOOKS:

The Declaration of Independence: The Words That Made America
Author: Sam Fink
Book Jacket for: The Declaration of Independence
The text of the Declaration of Independence is rendered artistically, along with colored drawings, to truly illustrate this most important document.

 

 

 

Mumbet’s Declaration of Independence
Author: Gretchen Woelfle
Book Jacket for: Mumbet's Declaration of Independence
This beautiful picture book tells the true story of a slave who took her master to court to win her freedom in the late 1700s. When the Declaration of Independence was drafted and her state adopted a new constitution, Mumbet decided that the freedoms promised in these documents were meant for all people, including herself.

 

Founding Mothers: Remembering the Ladies
Author: Cokie Roberts
Book Jacket for: Founding mothers : the women who raised our nation
New York Times
bestselling author Cokie Roberts adapts her acclaimed book on the women of the American Revolution for children.

 

 

 

You Wouldn’t Want to be a Civil War Soldier
Author: Thomas Ratliff
Book Jacket for: You wouldn't want to be a Civil War soldier! : a war you'd rather not fight
Part of a popular series, this nonfiction selection describes life as a Civil War soldier from living conditions to weaponry to medical care. The book addresses the reader as an actual soldier and includes wacky illustrations to make it a fun read.

 

 

George: George Washington, Our Founding Father
Author: Francis Anthony Keating
Book Jacket for: George : George Washington, our founding father
For younger readers, George Washington’s story is told from his own point of view in a picture book format.

 

 

 

 

Independence Day Crafts
Author: Mary Berendes
Book Jacket for: Independence Day crafts
Aimed at very young crafters, this book provides instructions for making fun Fourth of July crafts, mostly with items from around the house.

 

 

 

–Post by Megan Katz

–Top photo by Steve Young, 1964, part of the Library’s Photo Collection. “The year, the school, and even the clothes were new this morning as these five students of Harding Street Elementary School, Sylmar, gathered for their first flag raising with – a new flag.”

 

Lost & Found at the Movies: All That Glitters

“I love watching movies. It’s my drug of choice,” award-winning filmmaker Miguel Arteta once confessed in an interview. This Monday, June 30, Arteta—a self-professed Turner Classics addict—will join Lost & Found at the Movies in the first of three summer programs at the downtown Central Library. Curated by John Nein, the upcoming edition of the Library Foundation’s new series on film culture will feature a conversation with Arteta on some of his favorite classics from Hollywood’s Golden Era. From groundbreaking women’s roles to undiscovered works, Arteta (Cedar Rapids, The Good Girl, Chuck & Buck, Star Maps) will share his passion for the great films of the classical era as Nein digs up some rare home videos from the UCLA Film & Television Archive to take us behind-the-scenes of moviemaking during that time. Before we revisit some glittering moments of cinematic history, here’s a look at a few Hollywood gems to get you ready for Monday’s program.

Clash by Night with Marilyn Monroe

Possessed with Joan Crawford

A Letter to Three Wives with Ann Southern and Jeanne Crain

Beyond the Forest with Bette Davis

Samuel Fuller’s Shock Corridor

Learn more about Lost & Found at the Movies and make your free reservation!

Dear ONE: Love & Longing in Mid-Century Queer America

From 1953 to 1967, ONE Magazine, America’s first openly gay and lesbian periodical, reached thousands of readers each month—many who were isolated and in search of community.  Those readers wrote back to ONE seeking counsel and advice, or friendship and understanding. Subjects ranged from family life to coming out stories to tales of harassment. In 2000, historian Craig Loftin was working on his dissertation at USC when he came across a collection of these letters, stored at ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives – the oldest LGBTQ organization in the Unites States, and the publisher of ONE Magazine. Many of the collections were unprocessed and uncatalogued. I became a volunteer and helped sift through boxes of mysterious documents,” Loftin explains. “Finding the letters was completely unexpected; I wasn’t looking for them. In fact, no one at the Archive knew they were there.”

The data he compiled on issues facing gay people in the 1950s and 1960s became the basis for his dissertation and his book Masked Voices, published by SUNY Press. The press suggested he also compile the ONE letters in a separate volume, which became Letters to ONE: Gay and Lesbian Voices from the 1950s and 1960s, published in 2012. ONE Archives then reached out to director Zsa Zsa Gershick about adapting the material for a dramatization to celebrate ONEs 60th anniversary that same year. Gershick, who had created other oral histories like, “Gay Old Girls” and “Secret Service,” about lesbians in the military, was familiar with transforming long letters into tight, poignant soliloquies. For the adaptation, Gershick faced similar challenges, “The task was to find each letter’s central theme, its heart, and seamlessly pare from that heart or essence everything that obscured it. I consider this a sacred endeavor, requiring a great deal of respect, focus and prayer to get it right,” she says.

On Saturday, June 28th Gershick will direct a dramatic reading of these letters for the ALOUD stage, in a production she titled “Dear ONE: Love and Longing in Mid-Century Queer America.” As Gershick worked her way through Loftin’s collection, she fell in love with each letter. “Each one gives us a window into an era of terrible prejudice. Many people today don’t know that American queerfolk of that era, if discovered, could be jailed, disemployed, imprisoned in mental hospitals, or lobotomized. The letters reflect this reality. Some letter writers boldly signed their names; others remained anonymous. But each correspondent, in the simple act of writing, asserts his/her right to be,” she says.

Despite all of the hardships facing gay people at the time, Loftin says he was surprised by the resilience and optimism of the letter writers, “So many letters had an upbeat tone even when they described tragic events. Some of them were hysterically funny. Instead of thinking about gay people in the 1950s as victims, I began seeing them as dynamic and creative historical agents carving out a niche for themselves in a hostile society. In these letters, one finds early stirrings of a gay rights consciousness at a mass level.”

From gay marriage to employment discrimination, the letters shed light on many issues still being confronted today. “No two letters are quite the same. Reading the letters, we try to imagine who these people were, what they looked like, where they lived, the details of their lives. We try to imagine how their voice might have sounded. We bring our own experiences to these letters and make sense of them in our own ways,” says Loftin. Gershick hopes her adaptation will capture these deeply moving voices, “Upon hearing these letters performed aloud, I hope that the audience laughs, cries, learns a little history and embraces our humanity.”

Learn more about the upcoming ALOUD program here.

Main image: ONE Magazine covers from the 1950′s and 1960′s, courtesy of ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries.

Shop for Father’s Day at The Library Store!

Have you thought about shopping for Father’s Day yet? We suggest letting your dollar do double duty by heading on over to The Library Store to get your dad a gift he’ll really love and supporting the Los Angeles Public Library with your purchase! It’s a far better idea than adding yet another tie to his collection…

Here are some suggestions to get you started:

 The Gentleman’s Handbook – $17.95

 Anywhere Travel Guide – $12.95 Whiskey Lover Set – $65 Beer Tasting Tool Kit – $24.95

And don’t forget! Come down to the Central Library and we’ll help you find the perfect card for the occasion too.

Help Feed Kids’ Bodies and Minds

To ensure that students who receive free school lunches don’t go hungry during summer break, the Library Foundation has teamed up with the Los Angeles Public Library and the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank to expand the Summer Lunch Program to 10 libraries. Volunteers are needed for all aspects of the lunch program—from serving food, setting up lunch and clean up to helping with kids’ activities and enrolling kids in the reading clubs.

Volunteer Dates: June 9 to August 1

Volunteer Hours: Monday through Friday, noon to 2:00 PM

Commitment:  At least 2 days (4 hours) a week for all 8 weeks of the program.

Requirements: Volunteers must attend an orientation and have a valid Los Angeles Public Library card.

Ages 14 and up may volunteer.

Participating Libraries: Central Library, Cypress Park Branch, Exposition Park Branch, Hyde Park Branch, Mark Twain Branch, Pacoima Branch, Pico Union Branch, San Pedro Branch, Van Nuys Branch, Vernon Branch

To learn more about volunteering, please contact the branch directly or Volunteer Services at 213.228.7540.

10 Ways to Savor the Summer with the Los Angeles Public Library

It’s the season of fun in the sun, far-off travel, BBQs, and of course catching up on some rest and relaxation. Here are some FREE ideas on how to use the Los Angeles Public Library to make the most of your summer.

#1 – Travel Light

Don’t overload your suitcase with travel guides. From Lonely Planet to Fodor’s, your favorite travel books are now available as downloads for your iPad or tablet.

 

 

#2 – Talk Like a Local

Preparing a trip to a foreign country? From Italian to Korean to Arabic to Russian, the Library offers online language courses through Mango Languages and Powerspeak Languages.

#3 – Photography 101

Before you take that scenic hike or light fireworks for Independence Day, learn how to better capture your summer moments. Through Gale Courses, you can take six-week interactive online courses on mastering digital photography and Photoshop, as well as other topics like computer programming, creative writing, and financial planning.

 

#4 – Cook with Class

The farmer’s market is in full swing in the summertime, so take your culinary skills to the next level. Enroll in an online cooking class with Universal Class, a continuing education program with over 500 online courses led by expert instructors.

 

#5 – Plan a Staycation

How do you take a docent-led tour of Central Library? What’s a good L.A. noir read? Where might you find maps of canyon trails? Use the Ask a Librarian tool to call, e-mail, text, or IM for answers to your library-related questions.

 

 


#6 – Easy Listening

Hoping to read the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Goldfinch, but don’t want to drag that behemoth book to the beach? Check out the audio version along with thousands of other books as CDs or downloadable forms.


#7- Get Crafty

Browse the Library’s calendar of arts and crafts activities to keep inspired this summer from the Crochet and Knitting Club at Valley Plaza to the LACMA Teen Art Workshops at Pio Pico-Koreatown.

 

#8 – Now Playing

If you want to curl up on your couch for movie night, or watch a film on a big screen, the Los Angeles Public Library has you covered. Stream movies at home through hoopla or OverDrive. Or visit a branch for regular and special film screenings like “Tuesday Night @ the Movies” at Memorial or “Saturday Matinees” at Los Feliz.

#9 – Stay Current

With free downloads of your favorite magazines through Zinio, you won’t need to hang out in waiting rooms to stay in the know. There’s Newsweek and The Economist for your news fix, or Us Weekly and Rolling Stone for your pleasure, among many more popular titles to choose from.


#10 – Real Research

For the more serious-minded, use the new Book a Librarian service to schedule a half-hour session with a reference librarian or subject specialist at Central Library. From starting your own business to digging into your family genealogy, it’s never been easier to learn how to use the resources of the Library.

 

 


Visit lapl.org for more info on all these resources.

Art work by Florian Brozek.