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Lost & Found at the Movies is the Library Foundation’s new series celebrating the art of cinema and the vitality of film culture. Eclectic in theme and varying in form, this onstage magazine explores how we lose ourselves and find ourselves at the movies.

Befitting our library setting, Buck Henry and series curator John Nein explore writing and the art of adaptation, including rare and unusual renditions of Shakespeare (the most adapted author in film history?) a handful of lesser-known, wildly imaginative adaptations and Henry’s own literary adaptions, including Catch-22, The Graduate To Die For while exploring the writer, actor, director’s rich life in cinema.

Contact Libby McCarthy at libbymccarthy@lfla.org or 213.228.7503 with questions.

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Buck Henry

Buck Henry is an American actor, writer, film director, and television director. He has been nominated for an Academy Award twice, once in 1968 for Best Adapted Screenplay for The Graduate and once in 1979 for Best Director for Heaven Can Wait.Henry was born in New York City, the son of silent film actress Ruth Taylor. Henry’s dry humor attracted attention in the entertainment community. He became a cast member on TV programs such as The New Steve Allen Show (1961) and That Was The Week That Was (1964Ð65). He was a co-creator and writer for Get Smart (1965Ð70), with Mel Brooks.Henry hosted NBC’s Saturday Night Live ten times, appearing first in 1976, and for the last time in 1980. It became a tradition in those four years that he hosted the last show of each season. Henry also hosted the only live remote attempted by SNL, broadcast live from Mardi Gras in New Orleans. During the October 30, 1976 episode, Buck Henry was injured in the forehead by John Belushi’s katana in the samurai sketch. Henry’s head began to bleed and he was forced to wear a large bandage on his forehead for the rest of the show. As a gag, the members of the SNL cast each wore a bandage on their foreheads as well.Henry has appeared in more than 40 films including Catch-22, Taking Off, The Man Who Fell to Earth, Gloria, Eating Raoul, Aria, The Graduate, Tune in Tomorrow, Defending Your Life, The Player, and Grumpy Old Men. He co-directed Heaven Can Wait, the 1978 remake of Here Comes Mr. Jordan, and appeared in the film as an officious angel, reprising the character originally played by Edward Everett Horton.His many writing credits include Candy, The Owl and the Pussycat, What’s Up, Doc?, Catch-22, The Day of the Dolphin, Protocol, and To Die For. He shared an Oscar nomination for his screenplay, The Graduate, a film in which he made a cameo appearance. In 1997, Henry was the recipient of the Austin Film Festival’s Distinguished Screenwriter Award.His Broadway credits include the 2002 revival of Morning’s at Seven. Off-Broadway in July 2009, he starred opposite Holland Taylor in Mother, a play by Lisa Ebersole.

 


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John Nein

John Nein is a senior programmer at the Sundance Film Festival and deals primarily with US and international feature films. He also plans the festival’s panels and runs the Institute’s film preservation initiative. John grew up in Europe and the United States, studied history at Carleton College and earned his MFA from UCLA’s Film Directing program, where he made several award-winning shorts and lobbied tirelessly for better coffee in the vending machines.


Frequently Asked Questions

  • How much does Lost & Found at the Movies cost to attend?

    Lost & Found at the Movies is free to attend.

  • Can I attend if I’m not a Member?

    While priority notification is given to LFLA Members, non-Members are welcome to attend if space allows. However, the complimentary reception following the program is limited to Members.

  • Do I have to make a reservation?

    Reservations are recommended, as our programs often fill to capacity. Priority is given to reserved guests.

  • Can I attend even if I don’t have a reservation?

    Yes! We often have space available to accommodate walk-up guests without advanced reservations. Check our stand-by policy for more information.

  • Reservation Policy for Free Programs

    As Lost & Found at the Movies is free of charge, it is our policy to overbook. In the case of a FULL program your free reservation may not guarantee admission. We recommend arriving early. Unclaimed reservations will be released to standby patrons at the start of each program.

  • Standby Policy

    Standby numbers are distributed in person only one hour before the program, on a first-come, first-served basis. There is no advance wait list for full programs. Standby patrons will be admitted based on availability. Most programs will be available via podcast. Become a Member of the Library Foundation to receive priority notification of these programs.

  • Canceling a Reservation

    If you are unable to use your reservation, please email libbymccarthy@lfla.org.

  • Where does Lost & Found at the Movies take place?

    Unless otherwise noted, Lost & Found at the Movies is held at the downtown Central Library’s Mark Taper Auditorium.

  • Where should I park for Lost & Found at the Movies?

    We recommend taking public transportation. Parking for the Central Library is at the Westlawn Garage at 524 S. Flower Street. For more information, visit the Library’s website.

  • Where do I purchase the speaker’s book?

    Occasionally a guest on Lost & Found at the Movies is touring with a book. Books are made available for purchase at programs or can be purchased while making your online reservation. In order to participate in the book signing, you must purchase at least one book.


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