Gretel Ehrlich, Neal Conan
In conversation with journalist Neal Conan
July 19, 2016

Greenland’s ice sheet is now shedding ice so fast (five times faster than it did in the 1990s) that scientists have labeled Greenland’s seasonal sea ice “a rotten ice regime.” For 20 years, writer Gretel Ehrlich has traveled with Inuit hunters in Greenland, listening to their narratives and observing changes in their traditional hunting. This past spring, she went with some of those Inuit hunters to Paris, with plans to speak at the climate talks which were dashed when terrorists struck the city. In conversation with award-winning NPR journalist Neal Conan, Ehrlich reports on her experience in Greenland and Paris and discusses the challenge of climate change—how can we move from “it’s too late…” to “there’s much we can do”?

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