Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela
In conversation with Louise Steinman
January 30, 2003

A psychologist on South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission asks, “What does it mean when we discover than the incarnation of evil is as frighteningly human as we are?”

Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Cape Town. She served on the Human Rights Violations Committee of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Her critically acclaimed book, A Human Being Died that Night: A Story of Forgiveness, won the Alan Paton Prize in 2004 and the Christopher Award for non-fiction in the United States in 2004 for a book “that speaks to the human spirit.” The book was nominated as the Best Book of the Year in 2003 by the National Book Critics Circle in the United States. Her book has been released six times, including translations in German and Dutch.

 

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