Joel Simon, Gerard Ryle
In conversation with Alex Cohen
October 11, 2018

Technology has made possible new forms of transnational investigative journalism and fueled the rise of new digital media organizations in the U.S. and around the world. Yet more journalists are imprisoned around the world than at any time in recent history, censorship is on the rise, and government-run disinformation campaigns are undermining public understanding and fueling distrust in the media. Two leading figures in global journalism help make sense of this confusing and contradictory environment, and discuss how their organizations find unique opportunities to make an impact within this challenging and ever-changing landscape. Gerard Ryle is the director of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, which supports teams of journalists as they pursue groundbreaking investigations like the Panama Papers. Joel Simon is the executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, which fights for press freedom and the rights of journalists in the United States and around the world.

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